Remutaka Trig: A Perfectly Elevated “Place To Sit” (Complete With Seat)

There’s been much recent contention regarding the ‘tūturu’ (“true”) spelling of the kupu ‘rimutaka’, particularly if you’re a descendant of the tribe Rangitāne-o-Wairarapa.

Top o’ Remutaka, watching the approaching southerly roll in…

As always, there’s a story – in this case, a love story – telling of a torrid affair between roaming-roving ‘wifey’, Wairaka, and her suitably nameless slave lover.  Her husband, chief Haunuiananaia (or “Haunui”), was predictably none too pleased, and in his efforts to track her down he actually left a legacy of Māori, place-based nomenclature from Wairarapa back to his home-base in Hawke’s Bay.

“Rimutaka” is a part of this story – his story – and is apparently actually remutaka if your orthography is ‘tika’ (“correct”), which translates to mean: “a place to sit”.

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Panitahi-Fanthams Peak: Not For The Faint-Hearted

Without a doubt, ‘Mounga’ (“Mount”) Taranaki is the significant feature along the west coast of Aotearoa NZ’s North Island.  At 2,518 metres high (8,261 feet, for those of you who conceptualise accordingly), “Taranaki” dominates the skyline on all levels, and from all sides – as he should, really.

Māori lore recounts a “battle of all battles”, culminating in the “hiding of all hidings” – a gargantuan, terrifying, love- and lava-fuelled scrap between the two main heavyweight contenders of our fair nation’s northern volcanic landscape: mighty Mount Tongariro, and our boy, chiefly and majestic Mounga Taranaki (*read a suitably more fleshed-out version of events here, in one of my previous posts).

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